Recovering addicts can practice life skills, such as paying rent and maintaining a clean living space, while surrounded by other sober individuals. Sober living homes provide an excellent transitional living situation after recovering addicts complete an inpatient rehab program or while continuing to attend outpatient treatment. These recovery homes help recovering addicts get back into the groove of independent living as they transition from an addiction treatment program back to the real world. It’s totally fair to wonder how sober living homes work at first — after all, most of us don’t encounter them in our day-to-day lives. While many sober living homes and substance abuse halfway houses teach skills that would benefit anyone, certain segments of the population tend to be more in need of their services than others. Without these guidelines in place, there wouldn’t be much support or structure, which is the whole point of living in a substance abuse halfway house or sober living home instead of on your own.

sober living

If you or someone you know has recently quit drinking alcohol and is now sober—congratulations, quitting alcohol can be a long and difficult process. However, you might be wondering what happens now that the detox is over, you’ve completed your stay at an addiction treatment center, and it is time to go home. There are also several sober living homes run by religious groups, private organizations, or businesses. When looking into sober living in your area, you have to consider a few things—such as cost, amenities, and house rules specific to each facility. Since sober living houses are in residential neighborhoods, backyards may also be available and will be part of the shared communal space.

Family and Children’s Programs

Having a community of others who are facing the same challenges is also a powerful source of support. The best course of action for anyone who wants to get clean and sober is to seek help and make use of the resources of addiction experts. Sober living facilities give residents an opportunity to live in a safe, supportive, and alcohol and drug-free environment. Sober living houses (also called halfway houses or recovery houses) refer to group residences for people recovering from addiction. Sober living homes offer safety and support for people recovering from drug or alcohol abuse. You live in a substance-free environment while navigating the responsibilities of life in the real world.

This type of “giving back” is consistent with a principle of recovery in 12-step groups. Some are on the campus where drug and alcohol addiction treatment is provided, and others are independent homes, apartments or condos. The number of residents depends on the size of the home or licensed beds in a facility. In most sober-living environments, bedrooms are shared, but some do provide individual rooms. Typically, there are rules about shared living spaces and individual room maintenance and chores, visitor hours, meal times, curfews and Twelve Step meeting requirements. Residents of sober house facilities must abstain from drugs and alcohol, which provides an excellent peer support system for everyone who lives there.

Transitional Housing

Websites like Go Fund Me can be useful in reaching out to a large number of people for support. By sharing your story and your goals for the future on the site, you can ask for help from your loved ones and encourage them to share your message with their social networks. While it may not completely cover your expenses, every little bit helps and can help you move closer to your goals. Substance use disorders cause serious damage to the reward centers of the brain that affect willpower and motivation, so individuals find it very difficult to stay sober through the force of will alone. The study design used repeated measures analyses to test how study measures varied over time. Because the two types of houses served residents with different demographic characteristics, we conducted disaggregated longitudinal analyses for each.

The option that sober living homes provide is one that is significantly useful to many in recovery. Generally, those that are staying at a sober living home will remain there for at least 90 days, but stays can be arranged for as long as necessary. Research on sober living houses also states that residents experience a higher possibility of securing employment and a lower likelihood of getting arrested.

Sober Living/Group Homes

With a variety of treatment programs and compassionate staff, you’re sure to find the next step toward freedom. Those who reside in a halfway house are likely to be connected with a corrections officer, social worker and additional support to set up a life so they’ll be less likely to relapse after leaving. Halfway houses provide a transitional period in a regulated environment to increase the likelihood of life success. When you’re embarking on the first steps toward recovery, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the jargon of the addiction treatment world. Terms like “inpatient,” “partial-hospitalization,” and “medically-managed” may be different terms that you’re accustomed to in daily life, but are common to the world of addiction treatment.

Requiring an admission application for every resident also allows you to determine if the resident would be a good fit for your sober living home. This promotes a peaceful and harmonious environment in which residents share similar goals and get along. If you decide to open a co-ed sober living home, know that special rules and considerations will need to be made to ensure a welcoming and comfortable environment for all. If you’re just getting started, here is a basic overview of the steps you will need to take to successfully start a sober living home in your community. According to a research study conducted by NCBI, the average stay at a sober living home is between 166 days to 254 days. Design for Recovery Sober Living understands that recovery from a substance use disorder is about more than physical abstinence, but rebuilding lives from the ground up.